Chatham-Kent Aquarium Society

Bowl Show Schedule

Month

Category

Jan

No Show – no meeting

Feb

Goldfish & Koi, Fishy Crafts (includes photos)

Mar

Plants, AOV Fish

Apr

Characins; Corydoras, Aspidoras & Brochis

May

Livebearers, Killifish

June

Bettas; Sharks & Loaches

July

No Show – no meeting

Aug

Discus & Angelfish, Marine

Sept

Anabantids (excluding Bettas); AOV Catfish

Oct

New World Cichlids, Barbs, Danios & Rasboras

Nov

Old World Cichlids, Rainbowfish

Dec

No Show – Christmas party

Rules

Jan 2011

1.   One or two gallon bowls, unless special event is being held. Advance notice for special events and display size will be given. Otherwise a larger size vessel is allowed to accommodate the fish or plant comfortably.

2.    At least one side of the bowl must have a flat side to allow judges to see the fish without distortion.

3.    No gravel, plants or backgrounds allowed, also no exhibitor identification.

4.    No coloured lids allowed on bowls.

5.    No chemical which will tint water can be used: be it medicine or otherwise.

6.    All fish are to be the exhibitor's own fish.

7.    Only one fish allowed per bowl, or vessel.

8.    Late entries accepted only by the Bowl Show Chairperson.

9.    Exhibitor must be present at the meeting to participate.

10.  Failure to comply with the above rules will result in disqualification.

11.  There is no limit on the number of entries.

12.  Judges decision is Final. Any person entered in a class cannot judge that class.

13.      Point System For annual Accumulation.

·        1st place  - 4 points

·        2nd place - 3 points

·        3rd place -  2 points

An exhibitor is allowed one point maximum per class points for non-placing entries. No points will be awarded for damaged, deformed, diseased or immature entries. 

* The three highest pointed fish per category will be awarded placement.

14.      Bowl Show points will be printed in the monthly newsletter.

Bowl Show Explained

By Lisa Boorman

It’s come to our attention that not everyone really knows what the fish are in the categories for the bowl show that goes on in the general meetings. I’ll do a short explanation after each category with a few selected fish to give an idea of what you could bring to the bowl show. The only time something is not allowed is when it has its own category, e.g. discus and angels are done in September and are not to be done in the New World cichlid category in October. I’ve tried to stay away from the Latin names so newbies to the club and to fish should be able to participate as well.

 

January 

No meeting, so no show.

 

February

Goldfish & Koi; Fishy Crafts

Goldfish and koi is self-explanatory. Any type of goldfish can be brought; either fancy or not.  Fishy crafts can be anything fish related you made. Photos, cross-stitching and paintings are good examples.

 

 

March

Plants, AOV Fish

The plants category is simple. Any live aquatic plant can be shown. Some good examples are Amazon swords, Anubias sp. and Vallisneria sp. The AOV fish stands for All Other Variety fish. Basically what this means is you can bring something that does NOT fit into any category that is defined in the bowl show. Examples are black ghost knife, elephantnoses, spiny eels, bichirs (Polypterus sp.), freshwater puffers and African butterflyfish (Pantodon buchholzi).

 

April
Characins; Corydoras, Aspidoras & Brochis

Generally speaking, characins are tetras. Corydoras, Aspidoras and Brochis are similar looking (and related) looking armoured catfish.  Examples of common characins are cardinal tetras, neon tetras, lemon tetras and piranha. Commonly kept Corydoras species are C. paleatus, C. aeneus. These are the main two you find in petstores. Both can come in albino forms as well.

May


Livebearers, Killifish

Livebearers are also fairly self-explanatory. Any livebearing fish qualifies. Common examples are mollies, guppies, platies and swordtails. I believe that killifish is pretty much self-explanatory. Any killifish qualifies. Good examples are Golden Wonder Killies, Aphyosemion sp., etc.


June
Bettas; Sharks & Loaches

Bettas are anabantids that come from the genus Betta. Any species of Betta is included. There are many species of Bettas, but the most common one is Betta splendens. It’s more commonly known as the Siamese Fighting Fish.  Sharks and loaches deal with fish from the Cyprinid family that are commonly called sharks by the pet trade. They are not sharks, but have a similar appearance. Examples are red-tail sharks and  black sharks.  Loaches are generally slender freshwater fish with barbels. Common examples of loaches are weather loaches, khulii loaches and clown loaches.

 

July

No meeting, no show

 

August

Discus & Angelfish; Marine

Discus and angels are self-explanatory as well. Any marine fish or invertebrate.

 

September

Anabantids (excluding Bettas); AOV Catfish

Anabantids are fish that have a special organ called a labyrinth that allows them to breath oxygen from the air as well water. They are also called labyrinth fish. Common examples of anabantids are gold (or blue) gouramis, dwarf gouramis, pearl gouramis and paradisefish. AOV catfish are for any catfish that’s not specifically in any other category. Bristlenose plecos, common plecos, Synodontis sp. and raphael catfish would fit in here.


October
New World Cichlids; Barbs, Danios & Rasboras

New World cichlids are any cichlid that come from the New World. That includes all cichlids from North, Central and South America. Some common examples are convicts, severums, Apistogramma sp.  Barbs, danios and rasboras  include all species in the genera of Barbus, Devario, Rasbora, Puntius as well as many others. Good common examples are zebra danios, tiger barbs, tinfoil barbs, harlequin rasboras and scissortail rasboras.


November

Old World Cichlids; Rainbowfish & Blue-eyes

Old World Cichlids are cichlids that come from Africa, Madagascar and Asia.  Good examples are kribs, jewel cichlids and any Rift Lake cichlid.  Rainbowfish are all species of Melanotaenia, Glossolepis, Chilatherina, Rhadinocentrus & Iriatherina from Australia and New Guinea. This will also include all Bedotia from Madagascar.  Blue-eyes are Pseudomugils and Kiunga found in New Guinea and Australia. 


December
Merry Christmas! (Members & family members only)

There’s no bowl show this month. One of the easiest bowl shows there is.

 

I hope this answers your questions on what fish to bring to the bowl show. We would love to see you all participating in the bowl show. Also, if this does not answer your question(s) about the bowl show or the categories for it, please do not hesitate to contact the Bowl Show chairman. If the Bowl Show chair is not around, please feel free to ask another of the executive.